Some Thoughts on Blogging – January 15, 2011

Last September I did my first post on what I had learned about blogging up to that point.  I thought I’d swing back around and share some of the lessons I’ve learned about blogging since September.  Some of these will be for the blogger who’s serious about increasing their digital footprint and some of them will be general blogging tips and ideas.  Enjoy!

  • Like life it takes a while for your blog to establish its identity.  I’m still figuring out what some of my digital identity looks like.  It takes time but it is so important.
  • Whenever you decide to post, do it consistently.  Once a week, once a day, whatever your plan is, stick to it.  Be dependable.  People covet consistency.
  • Meta-tags will drive more traffic your way and get you deeper into the online conversation on different topics.  The trick is finding that fine-line, that law of diminishing returns, when it comes to adding tags.  The more tags you add the bigger the chance that you lose the identity of your blog.  Be diverse but don’t be potpourri.
  • Sometimes it takes a while for you to increase your digital footprint.  With well over 144 million blogs out there in cyberspace it can take a long time for your individual blog to make an impression.  Patience is a virtue.
  • Before I post I have started to ask myself this question:  what’s my purpose of posting this?  If it really has no purpose then I don’t post it.  I don’t delete it either but I save it just in case it has its purpose in the future.
  • Write from real life conversations.  If there was a topic that left a great impression on you from a conversation with a group of people chances are that a larger group of people is having that same conversation online.  Write about it and enter the online conversation as well.
  • I shared this last time but I’ll say it again because it’s important:  word count and strict editing is what drives the quality of your posts.  Being wordy and sloppy in your writing will kill your impact.
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